Edward Cargill

Cargill_Edward_FINAL_1Dr. Edward Cargill is currently the Applied Cell Biology Lead in Plant Biotechnology and a Science Fellow at Bayer Crop Science. He received his B.S. in Animal Science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and his Ph.D. in Genetics from the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program at Texas A&M University. Dr. Cargill is currently leading a team of scientists working on genome editing and plant transformation. Since working for Monsanto (now Bayer Crop Science), Dr. Cargill became an Adjunct Assistant Professor with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2016.

Dr. Cargill began working for Monsanto Animal Ag in 2006 researching dairy cattle traits, and transitioned to crop research at Monsanto in 2008. He spent the next 5 years working with engineers, scientists, and breeders to further develop Monsanto’s seed chipping technologies, double haploid corn process, and molecular detection methods. Dr. Cargill then transitioned to lead a team of discovery breeders in Monsanto’s Plant Breeding organization, which focused on breeding methodology, traits, phenotyping, and agronomic practices towards contributing improvements to the breeding pipeline. As gene editing technology became prevalent, he began leading a team of breeders and scientists at the intersection of the Plant Breeding and Biotechnology organizations to develop and implement editing technology in the breeding pipeline until transitioning to his current role.

As an Adjunct Assistant Professor with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Dr. Cargill serves as a faculty committee member for graduate students working full-time in industry while pursuing advanced degrees. His teams have also hosted multiple summer interns and co-op students. Dr. Cargill has also championed multiple collaborations between academic researchers and Monsanto, which he looks to continue doing with Bayer Crop Science. He also actively participates as a mentor to colleagues through Bayer Crop Science leadership development programs. Dr. Cargill is also an advocate for women in science as he actively participates in WiSE-Guys, an organization of men partnering with Women in Science Exchange (WiSE) to advance equality for women in STEM and leadership roles.

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